Outer Banks Voice

 

News and Information

Jack Foster Scott of Manteo and Raleigh, July 17

Submitted Story

Jack Foster Scott, a renowned photographer and friend of the people and places of the Outer Banks, died in Raleigh on July 17, 2019, following a prolonged illness.

Born on September 23, 1946, in Sri Lanka to Jack and Catherine Scott, Foster’s early years were spent in Bombay and Madras, India, where his father worked for Standard Oil Company and where Foster attended Kodaikanal International School.

Foster arrived in the United States in the 1960s to attend high school at Valley Forge Military Academy in Pennsylvania. In 1969 he graduated from the University of Richmond, where he was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha, Omicron Chapter. Soon after, he joined the Wendell Powell Studio in Richmond to hone his craft under esteemed portrait photographer Wendell Powell.

Photography suited Foster, a fiercely independent man and an intuitive observer. He arrived in the Outer Banks in 1972 for a three-year stay that ultimately stretched to almost four decades. On the coast, he combined his professional and personal passions by spending his time on, in and near the water, documenting the ordinary and extraordinary lives of his fellow barrier islanders.

As a news and feature photographer for The Coastland Times, he tracked the major events and daily happenings of the region; he highlighted the beauty of the area for the Dare County Tourist Bureau; and his freelance work captured wedding photos for countless couples and brought images of the Outer Banks nature, wildlife and people to the world beyond. His work has appeared in numerous books and his extensive library of Outer Banks scenes, images and portraits, capturing the subtle evolution of the Outer Banks over more than two decades is archived at the Outer Banks History Center in Manteo.

As the official photographer for Paul Green’s outdoor drama The Lost Colony during the 1970s, he photographed dignitaries, celebrities and political figures attending performances, as well as countless local cast members. His work appeared on TLC promotional materials, posters and post cards distributed throughout the southeastern United States.

From 1986 through 2001, he served as the Buildings and Grounds Supervisor for the Town of Nags Head, finding enjoyment in beautifying and maintaining the beaches for tourists and locals alike.

Foster spent his free time exploring the remote beaches and islands of the Outer Banks, and kayaking through inlets, waterways, and wildlife refuges. He cycled the roads and bike paths on Roanoke and Hatteras islands, and relaxed on the beaches of Nags Head with a Time magazine in hand. He swam and body surfed in the Atlantic Ocean, and enjoyed annual excursions to explore, relax and unwind with friends in Negril, Jamaica.

Foster is survived by his daughter Catherine Scott Lackey and husband Major of Raleigh, and their two children Brode and Eliza; his sisters Cyril Plessinger of Odessa, Florida, and Catherine Koch of Lyon, France; and two nephews, a niece and their families.

The family extends a heartfelt thanks for the kindness and love shown by so many as he navigated the challenges of Parkinson’s disease, especially the stellar care team at Brighton Gardens; medical professionals of Raleigh Neurology and Doctors Making Housecalls; his cheerleaders in the pool at Rex Wellness Center of Raleigh; caregivers Rosa Murimi, Rhoda Njeru, and Brenda Tribbey and finally the exceptional nurses and support team of Transitions LifeCare.

A private memorial service will be held for family at a later date.

Memorials may be sent to Transitions LifeCare at 250 Hospice Circle, Raleigh, NC 27607 or www.transitionslifecare.org/donate.

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Manteo gains control of Shallowbag Bay

Michelle Wagner

The abandoned boats of 2017 prompted Manteo’s push to control Shallowbag Bay. (File photo/Neel Keller)

The North Carolina General Assembly unanimously passed legislation on July 11 that places Shallowbag Bay within the corporate limits of the Town of Manteo, giving the municipality the authority to adopt and enforce ordinances regulating the scenic waters that wrap around the downtown district on Roanoke Island.

Previously, those waters were under the control of the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and the N.C. Marine Patrol.

For the Town of Manteo, that means it will now have jurisdiction over anchoring and mooring of vessels as well as the ability to better monitor and act on issues such as derelict boats, which plagued the municipality several years ago when two boats were left abandoned and unclaimed in nearby waters – one along the downtown’s waterfront and the other in nearby Doughs Creek.

The legislation, House Bill 429, was requested by town officials and introduced by N.C. House District 6 Rep. Bobby Hanig. It was part of a bill that also authorized Hyde County to regulate the navigable waters within Silver Lake on Ocracoke Island. For Manteo’s part, the bill identified the waters from the northern tip of Ballast Point extending northwest to the southern tip of Baum Point, along with Doughs and Scarboro creeks, as part of the town’s corporate limits.

Mayor Bobby Owens said that when the two abandoned boats became an unsightly part of the landscape back in 2017, some residents started a petition to have the boats removed.

“They found out it wasn’t that easy. You don’t just go get someone move a boat, and it was still hard because these were public waters,” the mayor noted.

Because the boats were unclaimed, and the state’s Wildlife Resources Commission and Marine Patrol monitored and patrolled the waters extending three miles from shore, town officials found themselves having to jump through a number of bureaucratic hoops to have the vessels removed.

Plus, Owens noted, “If a boat is adrift, it’s fairly easy to move. If it sinks, it’s the hardest thing to move.” It’s also rather costly, town officials discovered at the time.

The predicament prompted the town to seek the local bill. “With this legislation, we will be able to move a boat much easier, and keep the beauty as best we can,” the mayor asserted.

Town Manager James Ayers said that derelict and abandoned boats can not only cause damage to the environment, but also present hazards to boaters and other users of Shallowbag Bay. He noted that the regulatory hurdles in 2017 caused months of delays.

“But the new law will allow the Town to streamline the process by which people and the environment can be protected from such hazards,” he said.

With Shallowbag Bay now under the town’s jurisdiction, the municipality will also be able to adopt regulations addressing the types of activities permitted, speed zones, no-wake zones and the placement of navigational aids.

Town Manager Ayers said the development of regulations will include a robust community engagement effort.

“The next step is to listen to the community and seek feedback,” noted Ayers. Among the opportunities to provide public input will be the regularly scheduled meetings of the Manteo Board of Commissioners on September 4 and 18. The public is also being encouraged to send ideas and suggestions to a special email address at shallowbagbayregulations@manteonc.gov.

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Boat Builders Tournament to honor local boat builder

Submitted Story

Registration is open for the 16th Annual Carolina Boat Builders Tournament, July 24 to 27 at Pirate’s Cove Marina in Manteo.  The tournament is sponsored by the Dare County Boat Builders Foundation, a non-profit organization that promotes public awareness of the historical and cultural heritage of boat building in Dare County, but its main mission is to support educational opportunities for Dare County students whose families are involved in the marine industry.

Since 2010, the tournament has donated $724,100 in scholarships to Dare County students. This year’s tournament honors local boat builder Irving Forbes and is open to all boats—custom and production. Register online at www.dcbbf.org or come to Registration Night on Wednesday, July 24.

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Bonner named director of Renewable Ocean Energy program at CSI

Submitted Story

George Bonner has been named the new director of the North Carolina Renewable Ocean Energy Program (NCROEP).

The NCROEP is a research partnership that integrates coastal, electrical, civil and mechanical engineering with the natural and social sciences to research and develop technologies to harness ocean hydropower as a source of renewable energy.

      Supported by the North Carolina state legislature since inception in 2010, the NCROEP is led by the Coastal Studies Institute on Roanoke Island, along with the Colleges of Engineering at North Carolina State University, NCA&T, UNC Charlotte and East Carolina University. The program includes a range of scientists, students and industry professionals whose work focuses on various aspects of marine hydrokinetic power generation, thus building the foundation required to utilize ocean currents and waves as a renewable energy resource in the future.

“We are excited to have Mr. Bonner lead the North Carolina Renewable Ocean Energy Program as we enter this next stage of growth in our research on renewable ocean energy for the State of North Carolina,” said Dr. Reide Corbett, Executive Director of CSI and Dean of ECU’s Integrated Coastal Programs. “Bonner’s proven leadership and experience working across many coastal systems will be a valuable asset to the program, NC State, ECU and CSI.”

Bonner, a Roanoke Island native with three decades of engineering and management experience in the U.S. Coast Guard, will assume leadership of the NCROEP effective Aug. 1. The position is filled in partnership with the Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering at North Carolina State University and is located at the Coastal Studies Institute on East Carolina University’s Outer Banks Campus in Wanchese.

Bonner joins CSI and the NCROEP after 30 years as an officer and civil engineer in the Coast Guard. This experience has awarded him strong relationship building and collaborative experience working across public and private stakeholders, with many universities, and across all levels of government. Most recently, Bonner served as the USCG Deputy Director of Operational Logistics. In this role, Bonner supervised the mission support headquarters in Norfolk, VA and was responsible for mission support and logistics across the Coast Guard enterprise.

“Throughout my 30 year Coast Guard career, I have strived to support our motto of Semper Paratus,” said Bonner. “I am thrilled to return home to Roanoke Island and the opportunity to work with the NC State, ECU and the Coastal Studies Institute team in the emerging renewable ocean energy sector to help our state and nation remain Always Ready.” said Bonner.

“With rapidly expanding application of renewable ocean solutions to meet energy demands across the world,” Bonner added, “I’m excited with this role in advancing industry-leading research across the UNC System and promoting sustainable solutions to best serve our economy, national security, and environment.”

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Stephen Walter Marynowicz of Nags Head, July 13

Submitted Story

Stephen Walter Marynowicz, 83, completed his trip life trip on July 13, 2019. Stephen was born to Stephen and Thora (Robinson) Marynowicz in Philadelphia, PA on November 4, 1935. He graduated from Haddon Heights High School in Haddon Heights, NJ and served as a YN3 in the US Naval Reserve.

Stephen spent most of his life working as a sheet metal installer, retiring while employed with Tracey Services and the Sheet Metal Workers Union Local 19 in Philadelphia, PA. In 1993 Stephen became a “Damn Yankee” and retired to Nags Head, NC with his (late) wife Berta. He filled his time working various jobs, providing propane, bait & tackle, and working as an inspector for Joe Lamb and Associates.

He had many hobbies: shooting darts at Reggie’s Tavern, former member of the Riverview Shooting Club in Tabernacle NJ with his best friend Paul Pulaski, hunting, and was a lifelong fisherman and member of the Drum Runners surf fishing team on the OBX, NC.

Stephen is predeceased by his wife Berta and parents, Stephen, Jean, and Thora (Marion) Marynowicz and survived by his children Stephen (Violet) Marynowicz, Stephanie Nelson, Michael (Michelle) Marynowicz, Lisa (Stan) Morris, Gene (Debra) Leitenberger, and families.

A Memorial Service will be held at a later date.  Condolences to the family may be expressed via the online register at www.gallopfuneralservices.com. Gallop funeral services was entrusted with arrangements.

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Margaret White Bradley of Kill Devil Hills, July 16

Submitted Story

Margaret White Bradley passed away Tuesday, July 16, 2019. She was born in Norfolk, Virginia on March 28, 1924, to the late Rodney C. White, Sr. and Ada Machen White. Margaret was preceded in death by the love of her life, her husband of 73 years, James M. Bradley.

She was also predeceased by her three sisters, Vivian White, Mary Simmons, Udell Barlow and her three brothers, Rodney White, Jr., Willie White, and James White.

Left to cherish her memory are five sons, James Bradley, Jr. and wife Barbara of Kitty Hawk, NC, Edward Bradley and wife Linda of Chesapeake, VA, Steven Bradley and wife Ellen of Henrico, VA, Glenn Bradley and wife Linda of Wanchese, NC, and David Bradley and wife, Jenny of Virginia Beach, VA; eight grandchildren and thirteen great-grandchildren.

She was a Cub Scout den mother, public school bus driver, and an Avon representative for 20 years. Her favorite hobby was cross-stitching. Hundreds of her cross-stitching works are in many friends and relatives’ homes. Margaret greatly loved her family and they considered her the best mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and friend. She will be missed.

A memorial service will be held at 2:00 pm on Sunday, July 28, 2019, at Twiford Colony Chapel, Manteo, NC with Rev. Steve Siegrist officiating with a visitation beginning at 1:00 pm. Burial will follow at Roanoke Island Memorial Gardens.

Twiford Funeral Home, Manteo is assisting the family with arrangements. Condolences and memories can be shared at www.TwifordFH.com.

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Continuing Support for Patients with Parkinsons

Submitted Story

Southern Shores resident Bill Downing celebrates positive results in his session with Nicole Kalkhoff, a speech language pathologist and certified LSVT LOUD® therapist. Downing, who experiences Parkinson’s symptoms, recently completed a 16-session course of therapy at The Outer Banks Hospital Rehabilitation Therapy Center.

Nearly one million people will be living with Parkinson’s disease (PD) in the U.S. by 2020, according to the Parkinson’s Foundation.

The disease, which affects both a person’s ability to communicate and move, is difficult to diagnose because it develops differently from person to person. That’s why working with a doctor to evaluate symptoms and create a personal treatment plan is the best first step toward managing the disease. That, combined with lifestyle choices around diet/nutrition and emotional well being, can help people stay independent and enhance their quality of life.

To give Outer Banks’ community members with PD the option of staying near home for rehabilitation therapies, The Outer Banks Hospital (TOBH) offers both LSVT BIG® and LSVT LOUD® evidence-based services. Each involve 16 sessions over a four week period and focus on exaggerated activity to compensate for movement and speech challenges. Participants are encouraged to move in big or in amplified ways as they learn the LSVT BIG exercise protocol for daily carry over to skills like dressing, writing, better balance and retrieving items.

For speech, the focus is on loud speaking. Activities may include sustaining sounds such as “ah,” in addition to oral reading and speaking activities. The goal over 16 sessions is to get patients to use their body and their voice more normally.

“It’s a really great experience,” notes Bill Downing, a Southern Shores resident who began to experience trembling symptoms in 2007. He recently completed 16 sessions over the course of four weeks with therapists certified in LSVT BIG and LSVT LOUD.“The people here are so professional. They know what they’re doing and are up on all the latest stuff. This place is a treasure.”

Downing, a former naval officer and retired Nags Head postmaster, was diagnosed with Parkinsons in 2012. While he has received deep brain stimulation to help with his symptoms, he is most enthusiastic about the services he’s received at TOBH. “I admit I wasn’t thrilled to drive down to Nags Head for therapy but I have a much different attitude now,” he said. “This team cheers you on! They’re so enthusiastic and they really care.”

Occupational Therapist Angie Goetsch, a certified LSVT BIG therapist, works with BIll Downing to help him amplify his movements and practice balance.

With three certified LSVT BIG and LSVT LOUD therapists in the Outpatient Rehabilitation Therapy Center, the treatment is customized and it’s administered one-to-one. LSVT BIG therapy can produce noticeable improvements even for those with significant physical difficulties.

LSVT LOUD therapy can do the same for those with communication challenges Often individuals have LSVT BIG and LSVT LOUD therapies back to back on the same day.

“Those who complete the program have noticeable improvements,“ says Nicole Kalkhoff, speech language pathologist at TOBH. “When they complete the therapy, they have the tools to continue working on their own.”

Because TOBH therapists know that this therapy is key to continued management of symptoms, they are making plans to offer a weekly support group for those who have completed the program. Titled BIG for LIFE®/ LOUD for LIFE®, former patients will gather for an exercise program along with the opportunity to mingle over refreshments.

“The time spent with others who are managing PD and its impact can be very beneficial,” said Lisa Minerich, a TOBH occupational therapist who is also LSVT BIG certified. “In addition to review of the exercises, we want this to be an opportunity for individuals, their family members and caregivers to connect and motivate each other.”

Downing is clearly ready and willing to participate in the group sessions. “The way I see it, my full-time job now is to exercise,” he says with a grin. “Like they say here, don’t worry about what you can’t do—focus on what you can do and keep it going. That’s what I’m doing.”

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Paws Park in Kill Devil Hills

Submitted Story

 

This video highlights the KDH Paws Park, dedicated to our canine friends. The park is a feature of the Town’s Aviation Park, which is located at 103 Veterans Drive (across from First Flight High School). For more information, please visit www.KDHPawsPark.com

Full Story >>

Continuing Support for Patients with Parkinsons

Submitted Story

Southern Shores resident Bill Downing celebrates positive results in his session with Nicole Kalkhoff, a speech language pathologist and certified LSVT LOUD® therapist. Downing, who experiences Parkinson’s symptoms, recently completed a 16-session course of therapy at The Outer Banks Hospital Rehabilitation Therapy Center.

Nearly one million people will be living with Parkinson’s disease (PD) in the U.S. by 2020, according to the Parkinson’s Foundation.

The disease, which affects both a person’s ability to communicate and move, is difficult to diagnose because it develops differently from person to person. That’s why working with a doctor to evaluate symptoms and create a personal treatment plan is the best first step toward managing the disease. That, combined with lifestyle choices around diet/nutrition and emotional well being, can help people stay independent and enhance their quality of life.

To give Outer Banks’ community members with PD the option of staying near home for rehabilitation therapies, The Outer Banks Hospital (TOBH) offers both LSVT BIG® and LSVT LOUD® evidence-based services. Each involve 16 sessions over a four week period and focus on exaggerated activity to compensate for movement and speech challenges. Participants are encouraged to move in big or in amplified ways as they learn the LSVT BIG exercise protocol for daily carry over to skills like dressing, writing, better balance and retrieving items.

For speech, the focus is on loud speaking. Activities may include sustaining sounds such as “ah,” in addition to oral reading and speaking activities. The goal over 16 sessions is to get patients to use their body and their voice more normally.

“It’s a really great experience,” notes Bill Downing, a Southern Shores resident who began to experience trembling symptoms in 2007. He recently completed 16 sessions over the course of four weeks with therapists certified in LSVT BIG and LSVT LOUD.“The people here are so professional. They know what they’re doing and are up on all the latest stuff. This place is a treasure.”

Downing, a former naval officer and retired Nags Head postmaster, was diagnosed with Parkinsons in 2012. While he has received deep brain stimulation to help with his symptoms, he is most enthusiastic about the services he’s received at TOBH. “I admit I wasn’t thrilled to drive down to Nags Head for therapy but I have a much different attitude now,” he said. “This team cheers you on! They’re so enthusiastic and they really care.”

Occupational Therapist Angie Goetsch, a certified LSVT BIG therapist, works with BIll Downing to help him amplify his movements and practice balance.

With three certified LSVT BIG and LSVT LOUD therapists in the Outpatient Rehabilitation Therapy Center, the treatment is customized and it’s administered one-to-one. LSVT BIG therapy can produce noticeable improvements even for those with significant physical difficulties.

LSVT LOUD therapy can do the same for those with communication challenges Often individuals have LSVT BIG and LSVT LOUD therapies back to back on the same day.

“Those who complete the program have noticeable improvements,“ says Nicole Kalkhoff, speech language pathologist at TOBH. “When they complete the therapy, they have the tools to continue working on their own.”

Because TOBH therapists know that this therapy is key to continued management of symptoms, they are making plans to offer a weekly support group for those who have completed the program. Titled BIG for LIFE®/ LOUD for LIFE®, former patients will gather for an exercise program along with the opportunity to mingle over refreshments.

“The time spent with others who are managing PD and its impact can be very beneficial,” said Lisa Minerich, a TOBH occupational therapist who is also LSVT BIG certified. “In addition to review of the exercises, we want this to be an opportunity for individuals, their family members and caregivers to connect and motivate each other.”

Downing is clearly ready and willing to participate in the group sessions. “The way I see it, my full-time job now is to exercise,” he says with a grin. “Like they say here, don’t worry about what you can’t do—focus on what you can do and keep it going. That’s what I’m doing.”

Full Story >>

Sea turtle nesting record broken (again) at Cape Hatteras National Seashore

Submitted Story

Nesting green sea turtle found in Rodanthe, NC. Her nest contained 151 eggs.

For the third time in five years, a sea turtle nesting record at Cape Hatteras National Seashore (Seashore) has been broken.

In 2015, a nesting record of 289 nests was set, followed by a new record in 2016 when 325 sea turtle nests were found on Seashore beaches. Now, with more than a month to go before the nesting season typically winds down, the record has again been broken with the discovery of the Seashore’s 326th nest yesterday.

Sea turtle nest numbers (as of July 16 at 12 p.m.):

  • Loggerhead sea turtle: 317

  • Green sea turtle: 11

  • Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle: 1

“We are encouraged by the increasing numbers of sea turtles using Cape Hatteras National Seashore beaches to nest,” stated Tracy Ziegler, Chief of Resource Management and Science, National Parks of Eastern North Carolina. “According to our estimates, almost 11,000 sea turtle eggs have been deposited in beaches on Bodie, Hatteras, and Ocracoke islands.”

Be aware of sea turtle nesting activity, or hatchlings, while visiting the Seashore. If you see turtle tracks, nesting activity, or hatchlings, please notify park biologists by calling the stranding hotline at 252-216-6892.

The majority of current sea turtle nests aren’t expected to impact recreational access along the Seashore. For updated beach access information, go to: http://go.nps.gov/beachaccess.

Visit http://seaturtle.org for more information and to track nesting activities at Cape Hatteras National Seashore and around the world.

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SPCA Pet of the Week: Sasha

Submitted Story

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Virginia Dare Night Baby Auditions to be held at The Lost Colony

Outer Banks Voice

The 82nd Anniversary Season of The Lost Colony commemorates the 432nd birthday of Virginia Dare, the first English child born in the New World to colonist Eleanor Dare on August 18th, 1587. The Lost Colony continues its long celebrated tradition of using real babies during the August 17th performance. Being a “Virginia Dare Baby” is a coveted role in the community that many local citizens have had the opportunity of being a part of. For Virginia Dare Night only, the prop baby swaddled in blankets, is replaced with these special guests. Virginia Dare Night is generously sponsored by First National Bank.

To be considered for the honor of appearing on stage, all babies must attend an audition meeting on Saturday, July 20th at 10:00 AM in The Lost Colony Admin Building located by the Elizabethan Gardens within Fort Raleigh National Historic Site. The casting is open to all cheerful boys and girls that are 15 pounds or less. All Virginia Dare babies must be available for several hours on the evening of August 17th for pre-show preparation and for The Lost Colony performance. All selected Virginia Dare babies will be introduced from the stage prior to the performance at 7:45 PM.

In addition to the Virginia Dare Night performance, The Lost Colony and National Park Service will join forces in a special Virginia Dare Birthday Celebration starting at 5:30 PM at the Waterside Theatre with fun activities for families led by The Lost Colony company members and NPS employees. There will also be birthday cake served to kids 12 and under; the pre-show Birthday Celebration will be open and free to the public. The Virginia Dare Birthday Celebration and Night is sponsored by First National Bank. For further family entertainment, attend the performance of The Lost Colony that evening starting at 7:45 PM. More information is available on the website at thelostcolony.org or by calling the Ticket Office at (252) 473-6000.  The Lost Colony runs nightly through August 23, except Sundays.

Find and link to: https://www.thelostcolony.org/2019-virginia-dare-night-baby-auditions-held-at-the-lost-colony/


About The Lost Colony

First staged in 1937, The Lost Colony (a 501-c3 non-profit) is the nation’s premier and longest-running outdoor symphonic drama. Written by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, Paul Green, The Lost Colony’s 2019 season, sponsored by PNC, runs through August 23rd at Roanoke Island’s Waterside Theatre, on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Curtain time is 7:45 PM. For tickets and information, go to www.TheLostColony.org or call (252) 473-6000.

 

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Airport modernization project gains traction

Outer Banks Voice

Consultant Brent Lane said an expandedRegional Airport would provide a boost to the local economy (Neel Keller)

BY NEEL KELLER

There were clear signs of support from the Dare County Commissioners for a Dare Regional Airport modernization project that would include expanding the main runway following a presentation by consultant Brent Lane at the board’s July 15 meeting.

Because of technical glitches during his first presentation of the proposal at the June 3 commissioners’ meeting, Lane, who was hired by the Airport Authority to conduct the study at a cost of $19,500, agreed to present it to the board for a second time this week.

One of Lane’s primary messages, on both occasions, was that the expansion would be an economic engine for Dare County, as well as an antidote to what he called a “missing middle” problem that is causing an erosion of the “prime working-age” population in the county.

    It was a message apparently not lost on the commissioners.

“I think it’s time,” said Commissioner Danny Couch, voicing strong support for the expansion. “We’ve got a screaming economy here. And we had the study from N.C. State that indicated that we have to expand. Yes, tourism is our bread and butter, but, if we’re going to expand in other directions, we’ve got to meet the challenges of what’s coming. And air is going to be it.”

“I think it’s critical that we get this accomplished,” Board Chairman Bob Woodard told the Sentinel after the presentation. “We don’t need to be left behind.” Noting that the board feels the same way, he added: “It’s critical that we expand this to help continue to foster a strong economy in Dare County.”

In his remarks, Lane said the proposal to extend the airport’s primary runway from its current 4,300 feet to 5,800 feet has an estimated cost of $30 million, of which $27 million is to be paid for by state and federal funding. The renovation, he added, would produce a projected 50% growth in economic impacts on Dare County and expand the current 513 jobs that generate $77,321,679 in economic activity in Dare County to 770 jobs that generate $115,950,432.

In addition to a “temporary benefit” during the construction work, providing an additional 188 jobs and generating an additional $30 million in economic activity, Lane stressed that the expansion would make the airport usable by the larger airplanes that increasingly make up the majority of the key “air commerce” flights.

The current 4,300-foot-long runway, he warned, is substantially shorter than many regional airports in the area, putting Dare County at a severe competitive disadvantage and threatening to make the airport “obsolete” in the not-too-distant future.

In making his argument, Lane cited a concerning “demographic” trend indicating that, while Dare County experienced a population growth of more than 7,000 residents since 2000, it actually saw a decline in the percentage of residents in the “prime working age” population between 25 and 54, which fell from 47% to 38% of the total population.

Characterizing this as a “missing middle problem,” Lane stressed that “it’s not that people are leaving this community because you don’t have commercial service. I’m afraid they’re not even considering coming here.”

Answering a question about a possible shutdown of the primary runway during the expansion work, Airport Director David Daniels said the runway could be cleared in advance of an aircraft landing there.

Addressing another question about the likelihood of expanding the runway on land versus into the sound, Board Vice Chairman Wally Overman said that the engineering work on the proposal has pointed to the main part of the extension going “into the sound, by necessity. In essence there’s just nowhere to go on land.” He added that, “from an engineering standpoint, this is not a big deal.”

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Dare County Emergency Management moves to online reentry permits

Submitted Story

(www.kittyhawknc.gov)

(Release from Dare County)

To improve reentry permit service delivery, Dare County Emergency Management has established an online reentry permit process. While no changes have been made to reentry priorities, all permits can now be obtained at DareNC.com/reentry. Permits from previous years will no longer be accepted.

While moving the process online allows permits to be obtained at any time, Dare County Emergency Management recommends going online now to obtain a 2019 permit. Doing so will help users understand how the new system works before permits are needed.

Following a mandatory evacuation order and when conditions allow, reentry priorities will be set by the Dare County Control Group. As reentry guidelines are established, details will be announced immediately and available on the Dare County website and through the Dare County Alert and Notification System. To receive alerts, anyone can subscribe in advance at DareNC.com/alerts.

During reentry, permit holders should print their permit and display it in plain view on the left side of their vehicle dashboard before arriving at a traffic control point.  If unable to print your permit, have it readily available for display on your mobile device. Permit holders must also have their matching driver’s license/identification ready for inspection by law enforcement officers. Following reentry, permit holders should continue to have their permit available along with matching identification available for inspection at checkpoints throughout the County.

Please note the system will deliver permits as Adobe PDF files attached to an email from reentry@darenc.com. If you complete the application and do not receive a response from reentry@darenc.com, please be sure to check your spam/junk mail folder. Once issued, all permits expire at the end of the calendar year.

If you have questions about the new online reentry permit process, please call Dare County Emergency Management at 252.475.5655 during regular business hours, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

 

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Mildred Midgette Burrus of Buxton, July 12

Submitted Story

Mildred Midgette Burrus, 85, of Buxton, NC died Friday, July 12, 2019, at Chesapeake Regional Medical Center.

A native of Buxton, she was born July 5, 1934, to the late Annie Brown Gray Midgett and Warren Robinson Midgett.

A member of Lighthouse Assembly of God, Milly was active in the women’s ministry. She loved to cook, crochet, and sing but her happiest moments were found in feeding and spending time with her family.

Milly is survived by three sons, Dal Burrus, Danny Burrus and wife Olivia, and Darren Burrus; daughter-in-law, Renee Burrus; six grandchildren, Tyke, Cathy (Paul), Emilie (Shane), Ashley (Stephen), Adrian, and Daniel; seven great-grandchildren, Starr, Dirk, Morgan, Marshall, Ethan, Dallas, and Asher; and a special nephew, Dennis Gaskins (Pat).

Along with her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Calvin Dallas Burrus, Jr.; and her son, Donald Warren Burrus.

A funeral will be held at 2:00 pm on Tuesday, July 16, 2019, at Lighthouse Assembly of God with Rev. Eric Hinson officiating. A reception will follow at the Family Life Center. The family will receive friends and relatives Monday evening from 6:00 until 8:00 pm at the church.

In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Lighthouse Assembly of God, PO Box 459, Buxton, NC 27920.

Twiford Funeral Home is assisting the family with arrangements. Condolences and memories can be shared at www.TwifordFH.com.

 

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Manteo High student wins state Patriotic Art contest

Submitted Story

Alyse Stewart moves on to national finals

Alyse Stewart’s award-winning art

Each year, more than 3,500 high school students from across the country participate in the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Auxiliary’s Young American Creative Patriotic Art contest. The contest began in 1979 to recognize up-and-coming artists and encourage patriotism in youth.  Any student in grades 9-12 who is enrolled in a public, private or parochial high school or home study program in the United States is eligible to enter the contest.  Applicants do not have to be related to a VFW or VFW Auxiliary member to participate, but the student must attend school in the same state as the sponsoring VFW Auxiliary.

Alyse Stewart with her award. Could there be one coming on the national level?

Alyse M. Stewart, a rising senior at Manteo High School, was the 1st Place Winner of this year’s local patriotic art contest held in April by Outer Banks VFW Auxiliary 10950, which was newly instituted in December of 2017.  After winning the contest on the Outer Banks, Alyse’s painting was subsequently entered into the North Carolina Young American Creative Patriotic Art competition at the state level.

It was announced at the joint VFW/VFW Auxiliary’s Council of Administration in Cary, North Carolina on Saturday, June 21, 2019 that Alyse Stewart had won the contest for the state of North Carolina!  Alyse’s painting has already been shipped to Orlando, Florida to compete against the winning artworks of the remaining 49 states for national awards totaling $29,500.

The winner of the national contest will be awarded a $15,000 scholarship.  The National Winner will be announced at the 106th VFW/VFW Auxiliary Convention taking place July 20-24, 2019 in Orlando, Florida.

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Truck blaze near Oregon Inlet

Submitted Story

According to an eyewitness report, this truck caught fire about 6:30 a.m. Sunday July 14 at the South end of Oregon Inlet bridge. The two men inside were reported to be from Virginia and there were no injuries. The Chicamacomico Banks Volunteer Fire Department responded to extinguish the fire.

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Remembering Denise Johnson

Mark Jurkowitz

Today is 22 years since the unsolved KDH murder

Today marks the anniversary of a crime that stunned the Outer Banks and that remains unsolved to this day. Twenty-two years ago, 33-year-old Denise Johnson was brutally murdered in her Kill Devil Hills home.

On July 13, 1997, the KDH Fire Department responded to a house fire in the 2000 block of Norfolk Street. Firefighters discovered Johnson inside the residence and removed her in an attempt to resuscitate her.

Once outside the residence it was discovered that Johnson had not succumbed to smoke or fire alone, but had also been stabbed. According to the state’s final autopsy report, she’d been stabbed in the neck and there were additional wounds on her body to indicate Johnson had fought for her life.

In an interview last year, Kill Devil Hills Police Lt. John Towler, characterized the Johnson case as “an open murder. It always remains a priority.”  In recent years, some of the most aggressive sleuthing on the case has been done by Delia D’Ambra, a Florida TV news reporter with deep ties to the Outer Banks.

D’Ambra — a UNC grad and the daughter of former Manteo Police Chief Francis D’Ambra — was four years old when her family moved to Roanoke Island in 1997, the same year Johnson was murdered.

Beginning her investigative work in January 2018, she has thus far produced 18 episodes of the podcast “CounterClock,” in which she has re-examined the case in painstaking detail — hoping to uncover enough new leads and information to give law enforcement new tools to solve the case.  (To learn more about this podcast, log on to https://counterclockpodcast.com/.)

In an interview this past week, D’Ambra said that CounterClock is on hiatus, but will resume next year.  Asked what people should be thinking about as another anniversary of the murder passes, she said: “I want people to remember that there is a family that is still grieving a heinous crime. And they have gotten no answers.”

One prominent member of that family is Denise’s older sister Donnie, a former Kill Devil Hills firefighter, who has remained vigilant about the case over the years.

“I feel that the podcast has helped me answer a lot of the hard questions I had,” she says. “As for knowing who really did it, I can only speculate.”

When she was asked what people should remember on this sad anniversary, Johnson responds, “just what a bright light Denise was.”

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Curnutte conquers cobia

Outer Banks Voice

(Photo by Lori Howell-Clark)

This specimen, caught by Bobby Curnutte at Avalon Pier on July 12,
measured 51.5 inches and tipped the scales at 41.7 pounds.

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Protest at Dowdy Park focuses on treatment of refugees

Outer Banks Voice

(Michelle Wagner)

A crowd of about 60 people gathered at Dowdy Park in Nags Head on July 12 for “Lights for Liberty: A Vigil to End Human Detention Camps.” The event was among hundreds of gatherings planned across the country on Friday evening to protest what organizers characterize as inhumane conditions faced by refugees at the U.S.-Mexico border. The protest came on the eve of planned U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids that the Trump Administration has indicated will begin Sunday.

The Dowdy Park protest included music, a handful of speakers and a silent vigil. Dozens of attendees also signed a petition asking U.S. Senators Richard Burr and Thom Tillis to investigate the “horrific conditions at child detention sites and demand answers from U.S. Customs and Border Protection.”

-Michelle Wagner

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Waiting on the Little Bridge

Outer Banks Voice

BY NEEL KELLER

This article first appeared in the Outer Banks Sentinel

(NAGSHEADNC.GOV)

The North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) confirms it has received the Nags Head Board of Commissioners’ recent request for a pedestrian-activated light at the crosswalk on the Little Bridge, the span used by fishing enthusiasts from the concrete walkways along the Nags Head-Manteo Causeway. The department says it hopes to have information to share with the town toward the end of this month.

Citing what they described as a defective crosswalk that NCDOT has failed to adequately address, the Nags Head Commissioners unanimously passed a resolution at their June 5 meeting requesting a traffic signal similar to the one on U.S. 158 that provides a pedestrian crossing between Jockey’s Ridge State Park and the shopping complex at milepost 12.5.

      “This board has said it, and said it, and said it again,” said Mayor Ben Cahoon at the meeting. “We don’t want one of those situations where someone has to die before something gets fixed.”

There have been two accidents involving a vehicle rear ending another one that stopped at the crosswalk on the bridge in recent weeks, according to Nags Head Police Chief Phil Webster. Webster also said that, since 2014, there have been 20 collisions at the bridge’s crosswalk.

NCDOT Division One Communications Officer Tim Hass told the Sentinel he had spoken to the DOT engineer on July 3 and explained that “the kind of data we’re looking to get takes weeks, not days to gather…We are in the process of gathering that data now, and will be doing about two more weeks of traffic counts.”

Noting that the department has also placed “mobile sign boards warning approaching traffic to look for pedestrians in an effort to get motorists to be more aware of the crosswalk while we gather that data,” Hass added that the engineer expects to have the new information ready to share with the town during the week of July 22.

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Christine Melvinia Scarborough Gray of Avon, July 10

Submitted Story

Christine Melvinia Scarborough Gray, 82, of Avon, NC died Wednesday, July 10, 2019, at Vidant Medical Center.

A native of Hatteras Island, she was born February 24, 1937, to the late Leona Williams and Ignatious Scarborough.

A member of St. John United Methodist Church, Christine was an avid bible reader and prayer warrior. She was an amazing woman and loving mother who enjoyed cooking, reading, and looking at old pictures. She was affectionately known as “Nana” to all those who surrounded her.

Christine is survived by one daughter, Misty Nagakane and husband Masato; two sons, Harold Gray, Jr. and wife Deborah, and Jeff Gray; five grandchildren, Amie, Mallory, Marshall, Kade and Layla; and one sister, Stella Price.

Along with her parents, Christine was preceded in death by her husband, Harold T. Gray, Sr.; and her brother, Ignatious “IG” Scarborough, Jr.

A memorial service will be held at 11:00 am on Saturday, July 13, 2019, at St. John United Methodist Church with Rev. Gina Miller officiating.

Memorial donations may be made to St. John United Methodist Church, PO Box 129, Avon, NC 27915 or online at www.stjohnobx.com.

Twiford Funeral Home is assisting the family with arrangements. Condolences and memories can be shared at www.TwifordFH.com.

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July 18-21Wright Brothers National Memorial announces details for 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 moon landing celebration events

Submitted Story

The moon above the First Flight Bounder the evening of July 20, 1969.

Wright Brothers National Memorial invites the public to help celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the First Lunar Landing through a series of special events from July 18-21. Wright Brothers National Memorial will be fee-free on July 20th, and open until 9:00 p.m.

Special guest on July 20th will be active NASA Astronaut Eric A. Boe (Colonel, U.S. Air Force Retired). Eric Boe was selected as an astronaut by NASA in 2000, and is a veteran of two space shuttle flights, serving as a pilot for the Space Shuttles Endeavour and Discovery. Boe and his crewmates are currently working closely with Boeing to develop their new spacecraft systems, which will provide crew transportation services to the International Space Station and return the ability to launch humans into space from United States soil. Boe will give a special “Ask an Astronaut” program and take part in a public meet-and-greet on Saturday, July 20th, prior to speaking at the evening’s feature event. Wright Brothers National Memorial appreciates First Flight Foundation’s efforts to make Eric Boe’s visit to the Outer Banks possible.

During the evening of July 20th, a viewing party will  be held on the grounds of Wright Brothers National Memorial from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., where the original news footage of the first lunar landing will be rebroadcast. This will recreate a viewing party that took place at the visitor center on July 20, 1969.

 

NASA Astronaut Eric A. Boe

Thursday, July 18

6:30pm Apollo 11 Activities at Dowdy Park (Ranger Program)
Join Park Rangers for hands-on learning activities for kids prior to the 8pm movie showing. 

8pm “Apollo 11” Documentary at Dowdy Park (Special Event)
At around 8:00 p.m., the “Apollo 11” documentary will be shown at Dowdy Park in Nags Head. This free event is supported by the First Flight Foundation.

 

Friday, July 19

10am, 11am, Sand Dunes & Moon Dust (Ranger Program)

12pm, 4pm Learn about the events leading to the first powered flight in 1903 and its similarities to the Apollo 11 mission.

1pm, 2:30pm The Wright Stuff (Ranger Program)
Explore the Legacy of the Wright Brothers from Kitty Hawk to Tranquility Base.

 

Saturday, July 20

10am, 11am, 4pm Sand Dunes & Moon Dust (Ranger Program)
Learn about the events leading to the first powered flight in 1903 and its similarities to the Apollo 11 mission.

10am, 3pm, 4:30pm Planet Walk (Ranger Program)
Join a park ranger to walk a scale model of the solar system on the grounds of the memorial. Learn about distant planets and how they relate to each other.

12pm Apollo 11, Final Chapter in the Space Race
National Park Service volunteer, Chris Godart, will present a program called “Apollo 11, Final Chapter in the Space Race.” Explore the events leading up to the historic mission of Apollo 11, and learn how the mission progressed to safely land man on the moon and return to earth.

2pm Ask an Astronaut with NASA Astronaut
NASA Astronaut and Space Shuttle veteran Eric Boe will give a short presentation on his experiences in space and lead a question and answer session with the audience.

3 pm The Wright Stuff (Ranger Program)
Explore the Legacy of the Wright Brothers from Kitty Hawk to Tranquility Base

5pm Meet and Greet with NASA Astronaut Eric Boe (Public Event)
Meet a real-life astronaut, and interact informally.

7pm Special Guest Speakers (Feature Event)
Active NASA astronaut Eric Boe, and a representative from NASA Langley Research Center, will discuss spaceflight, the legacy of the Wright Brothers, and the newest NASA initiatives to return man to the moon and beyond.

8:10pm Walter Cronkite Footage of the Moon Landing (Feature Event)
Rebroadcast of Walter Cronkite’s famous moon landing news coverage will begin just after 8:00 p.m. and conclude around 8:45 p.m.

Additional July 20 details:

  • Visitors should bring beach chairs and flashlights.
  • Visitors are encouraged to dress up as astronauts or in 1960s era costumes.
  • Special activities for kids will be provided by the NPS and NASA Langley Research Center in the Junior Aviator Store.
  • Food trucks will be available at the memorial for guests to purchase food.
  • In the event of rain, the speakers will still present their talks under a tent, as well as the viewing party.  In the event of severe weather, the event will be canceled.


Sunday, July 21

10am, 11am, Sand Dunes & Moon Dust (Ranger Program)

12pm, 4pm Learn about the events leading to the first powered flight in 1903 and its similarities to the Apollo 11 mission.

1pm, 2:30pm The Wright Stuff (Ranger Program)
Explore the Legacy of the Wright Brothers from Kitty Hawk to Tranquility Base.

For more details, visit: https://www.nps.gov/wrbr/planyourvisit/apollo-11-50th.htm.

Wright Brothers National Memorial thanks Outer Banks Forever, First Flight Foundation, and First Flight Society for their support of these special celebration events.

 

 

Visit online:

Cape Hatteras National Seashore: Official Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Fort Raleigh National Historic Site: Official Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Wright Brothers National Memorial: Official Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

 

 

About the National Park Service

Since 1916, the National Park Service has been entrusted with the care of America’s more than 400 national parks. With the help of volunteers and partners, we safeguard these special places and share their stories with millions of people every year.

Learn more at www.nps.gov.

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The Wrong Incentive at the Wrong Time in the Wrong Place

OBAR

Clark Twiddy, CEO of Twiddy & Company

By Becoming Indispensable, Unregulated Home Sharing Businesses Have Created a Penalty Box for Our Professional Licensed Employers and Threaten Our Blue-Ribbon Tourism Economy

No industry is resistant to change even in a place as consistently beautiful as the Outer Banks. While the Outer Banks tourism industry continues to be an economic driver on par with anything in North Carolina, we’re witnessing significant inflection points within our historically rich core business models. Likewise, as the velocity and access to technological innovation increases, it’s vital to ensure that regulatory measures correspond with our region’s dominant economic driver – tourism.

For decades, the Outer Banks professional property management companies, and arguably the region’s largest local private employers, and taxpayers, have been tightly regulated by the State of North Carolina. These regulations delivered enormous benefits to consumers and are one of the key reasons for the economic vibrancy along our shores. However, with the advent of unregulated private accommodation companies like AirBnB and VRBO becoming more and more prevalent, the time has come to review and potentially recalibrate the regulatory architecture to ensure that the same level of governmental oversight applies to the same kinds of businesses. Of note, the issue is not whether home sharing is a negative business construct – fair competition identifies and promotes true consumer value. Instead, the issue is whether unequal regulatory application and unfair governmental enforcement leads to a better or worse economic climate for our local, private businesses?

That dilemma is not to say that we need more regulation or that we should discourage fair competition–we simply need equal regulation and enforcement that applies fairly to similarly situated business archetypes.

The home sharing business and professionally managed rental companies are performing the exact same functions–renting homes to vacationers and then attempting to create a valuable, memorable and rewarding experience during their stay. They do so, however, with completely separate regulatory burdens – the home sharing businesses operate without any regulations whatsoever, while the licensed vacation rental firms fall under various statutory and regulatory compliance measures.

In other words, as compared to private home sharing, current long-standing regulations unintentionally create a disincentive to economic development in all the wrong ways. Why should any vacation rental business subject themselves to state licensure and scrutiny when Airbnb and VRBO operate in an unrestricted manner? The answer is not just for local and state governments to simply tax the home sharing transaction, but rather to regulate them in the same manner as is currently required for the professionally managed vacation rental businesses. Turning a regulatory blind eye to home sharing, places the safety, consistency and vibrancy of residential Outer Banks vacation rentals squarely on the chopping block.

The time for either eliminating decades-old regulations and laws in the vacation rental industry or requiring that the home sharing enterprises fall under the same governmental scrutiny is now. The objective is a fair and balanced regulatory landscape. To do otherwise, simply penalizes our best and broadest, private regional employers (and their staffs, subcontractors, and vendors) while giving birth to a grossly unbalanced and unfair competitive environment. An environment where the unregulated businesses flourish, and the long standing, law-abiding professionally managed firms struggle.

Article provided by Clark Twiddy, CEO of Twiddy & Company

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IT’S JUST ONE INCIDENT OF THEIR DAY.......Ocean Rescue helps swimmer in despair near Jennette’s Pier

Submitted Story

PHOTOS BY CARL LEWIS

Nags Head Ocean Rescue (NHOR) responded to a swimmer out in the ocean in distress.
NHOR Lifeguards are trained to maintain concentrated observation of their duty area and its users in order to anticipate problems. They identify emergencies and quickly intervene with rescue measures.
This incident near Jennette’s Pier is an example of why it’s so important to swim near a lifeguard stand, swim with a flotation device, know rip current conditions and follow the lifeguard instructions.
Lifeguard Ethan did a great job bringing this swimmer to safety. Lifeguard Supervision Sarah assisted by assessing the swimmer to confirm no injuries and educate on rip currents and ocean safety.

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